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  • budwyche1

Aug 13

1951
» At Ebbets Field, the Dodgers offer up one of the odder promotions in "Music Depreciation Night," and every fan with a musical instrument is admitted free. 2,426 fans take advantage of the offer, including one with a piano. The Dodgers have a motive in countering the local musicians' union which wants to silence the non-union Sym-Phoney. The Dodgers outplay the Braves, 7–6, as Gil Hodges belts a 3-run homer in the 8th, following an intentional walk to Campanella, who had earlier homered.

Earl Wilson/The New York Times
Rachel Robinson, Jackie Robinson’s widow, at KeySpan Park on Sunday.
“I remember him,” said Mrs. Robinson, pointing to Danny Wilson, whose 85-year-old eyes were peeking over a bouncing trumpet at KeySpan Park in Brooklyn minutes before the hometown Cyclones took the field.

Mr. Wilson is the longest-tenured active member of the Dodgers Sym-Phony — as in phony symphony — which has played on, and on, and on since first arriving at Ebbets Field in 1939 to lead a famously off-key chorus of cheers for its beloved Brooklyn Dodgers, who left New York for Los Angeles after the 1957 baseball season.

Mrs. Robinson, the 85-year-old widow of Jackie Robinson, the Brooklyn Dodger great, smiled as she watched Mr. Wilson play “Take Me Out to the Ball Game” with a bunch of old friends: Arnie Mig, 85, on cymbals; Lou Mento, 82, on bass drum; Rex Sita, 77, on saxophone; and Nick Fiore, 77, on trombone. Mr. Wilson drove the band to Sunday’s gig in his own van.

“That first year, Dodgers management did not want us at the ballpark,” Mr. Wilson recalled. “They felt we were a nuisance, but the players and the fans loved us, so we had to sneak into the ballpark. One guy paid the admission fee and lowered a rope over the side of the stadium, and we tied our instruments to the rope and had them hoisted up. Then we ran into the stands and started playing.”

Mr. Wilson, who now lives in Lynbrook, N.Y. — “that’s Brooklyn backwards,” he noted — is one of two living links to the original Sym-Phony. He was recruited as a 17-year-old fill-in by the band in 1939, serenading umpires with tunes like “Three Blind Mice” alongside original band members — all dead except for JoJo Delio, 87, who lives in a nursing home in Massapequa, N.Y.

“Over the years, as the original guys disappeared, we took their places,” said Mr. Fiore, who joined the Sym-Phony 30 years ago. “Danny and the rest of us are all trained musicians who performed with big bands, but we’re still proud to keep this great tradition alive.”

The band members, who now perform at gigs like old-timers’ stickball games and the grand openings of retail stores, were in Coney Island on Sunday to help celebrate two anniversaries: It has been 50 years since the Dodgers packed their duffel bags and left town, and 34 years since the creation of the Jackie Robinson Foundation, which provides four-year college scholarships and mentoring to minority students.

“The Sym-Phony was one of the things people loved about Ebbets Field,” Mrs. Robinson said. “They provided a kind a special character and loving warmth that few other ballparks had, so I’d recognize them anywhere.”

1955
» Larry Doby makes his first error in the OF in 167 games, a new AL record.

1957
» Mickey Mantle goes 3-for-3 and drives in three runs as the Yankees edge the Red Sox 3-2. Mantle improves his average to .384 while Ted Williams, with 1-for-2, is at .388. A week later Mantle will injure himself when he angrily swings a golf club at a branch and gouges his shinbone. This will effectively take him out of the running for a second-straight triple crown.

1959
» The Giants and Cubs set a record for the longest 9-inning game in history, playing three hours and 50 minutes. Chicago wins the marathon at Wrigley by a score of 20–9, pounding out 19 hits and five home runs. Eddie Fisher takes the loss while Ed Donnelly is the winner.

1961
» In the first of two with the Senators, Roger Maris belts his 44th homer to tie Mickey Mantle. An inning later, Mantle, hits a Bennie Daniels offering for his 45th, but that's all Daniels allows, winning 12–2. Maris adds his 45th homer in the 1st inning in game two as the Yanks win, 9–4.

1962
» Bert Campaneris of Daytona Beach (Florida State League) pitches ambidextrously in a relief appearance. Facing Ft. Lauderdale, Campy throws lefty to lefthanders, and switches when righthanders come up.

to be continued...

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Aug 13

1964
» CBS buys 80 percent of the New York Yankees, effective November 2.

A day after the team and fans celebrate his birthday, ailing Fred Hutchinson again takes a leave of absence as manager of Reds. D ick Sisler again takes charge. Hutch will enter a hospital for further treatments.

One writer said Hutchinson looked like a man who had just lost an argument to an umpire - something Hutchinson often did. He was hot-tempered, given to tossing furniture about the clubhouse and smashing light bulbs after frustrating defeats. But he was extremely well-liked as a player, and as a manager, commanded love and veneration from his players.

Hutchinson was an aggressive, relentless, and smart pitcher, but did not have overwhelming speed. His career with Detroit was interrupted by four years in the Navy, but he returned in 1946 and had five consecutive winning campaigns, averaging 15 victories a season. A lifetime .263 hitter, he was used 91 times in the pinch, with four home runs - one of them his last hit, in 1953. For several years he was the AL player representative.

Hutchinson replaced Red Rolfe as Detroit manager in mid-1952. He left after the 1954 season because the Tigers would not give him more than a one-year contract. From 1956 through 1958, he managed the Cardinals. Cincinnati's Frank Lane explained why he hired Hutchinson in 1959: "When I was general manager of the White Sox and Hutch was at Detroit, I went looking for him in Chicago one night to talk about something. I found him in a hotel room with several players, explaining the cutoff play on a blackboard. He was the first manager I ever knew who believed in night school. That impressed me."

Hutchinson won one pennant with the Reds, in 1961, but lost the World Series to the Yankees. He battled cancer until he was forced to resign in August of 1964. Named as a coach for the '64 All-Star Game, he moved with great effort and pain, but would not miss it. The Reds went on to finish second. When Hutchinson died at age 45 that November 12, he was voted Most Courageous Athlete and was honored by several chapters of the Baseball Writers Association with fundraising events for cancer research.

1964
In a battle of teenagers, 19-year old Met first baseman Ed Kranepool homers twice off 18-year old Phillie hurler Rick Wise.

1968
» Pitching seven 2/3 innings, Tom Hall gains his first ML win as the Twins beat the Senators, 8–4. Washington's Jim Hannan (7-3) takes the loss and doesn't help himself at bat, striking out for the 13th straight time since July 24.

1969
» Commissioner Bowie Kuhn is elected for a 7-year term by unanimous vote of ML owners.

Joe Pepitone returns to the Yankees but does not play in their 5–2 loss to the Twins. Rich Reese is 4-for-4 with two homers and two singles to drive in four runs for the Twins as Jim Kaat is the winner over Mel Stottlemyre (16-9). Reese will have hits his first three at bats tomorrow before flying out.

Montreal reliever Elroy Face gives up the last of his record 21 extra-inning gopher balls, an 11th inning grand slam to the Reds Johnny Bench. Cincinnati wins, 8–3 in Montreal.

1972
» Bengals manager Billy Martin literally picks his starting lineup out of a hat in an attempt to halt the Tigers' 4-game losing streak. The ploy works as Detroit defeats Cleveland 3–2. Using a regular lineup in the nightcap, the Tigers lose 9–2.

1977
» Against visiting Seattle, the Red Sox have two outs in the 6th inning, and then unload back-to-back-to-back homers by George Scott, Butch Hobson and Dwight Evans. The Red Sox win, 13–6.

1978
» The Yankees erupt for five runs in the 7th inning to take a 5–3 lead over the Orioles before heavy rains force a delay of the game. Thanks to stalling tactics of Earl Weaver and some slow-moving Baltimore groundskeepers, the game is called, and the score reverts to the last complete inning. The Orioles win 3–0, with Scott McGregor the winner.

1979
» Lou Brock, 40, collects his 3,000th career hit, a single off Dennis Lamp, as the Cardinals top the Cubs, 3–2.

1980
» The Yankees trade righty Ken Clay and a player to be named later to the Rangers for 41-year-old pitcher Gaylord Perry.

1982
Dodger second baseman Steve Sax steals his 41st base to set a team record for rookies.

1985
» In the Mariners' 11–4 win, Seattle's infield again ties the major-league record for assists with 21 against California. Mark Langston goes all the way for the win.

1987
» The Cardinals outfield sets a major-league record by failing to record a single putout in a 4–2, 13-inning win over the Phillies. The previous mark was held by the 1905 St. Louis Browns, who played an 11-inning game with no outfield putouts.

Paul Molitor keeps his hit streak alive at 28 games when he homers with two out in the 9th inning against the O's. Baltimore still wins 5–4.

1993
» Rickey Henderson, recently traded to Toronto by Oakland, gives teammate Turner Ward $25,000 for uniform No. 24. Henderson had complained that he was having trouble hitting with No. 14 on his back.

to be continued...

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Aug 13

1995
» Baseball legend Mickey Mantle dies at age 63 from liver cancer in Dallas.

He played his entire 18-year major-league professional career for the New York Yankees, winning 3 American League MVP titles and playing for 16 All-Star teams. Mantle played on 12 pennant winners and 7 World Championship clubs. He still holds the records for most World Series home runs (18), RBIs (40), runs (42), walks (43), extra-base hits (26), and total bases (123).

Mickey Mantle was born in Spavinaw, Oklahoma. He was named in honor of Gordon "Mickey" Cochrane , the Hall of Fame catcher from the Philadelphia Athletics, by his father, who was an amateur player and fervent fan. According to the book Mickey Mantle: America's Prodigal Son, by Tony Castro, in later life, Mickey expressed relief that his father had not known this (Cochrane's true first name), as he would have hated to be named Gordon. Mantle always spoke warmly of his father, and said he was the bravest man he ever knew. "No boy ever loved his father more," he said. His father died of cancer at the age of 39, just as his son was starting his career. Mantle said one of the great heartaches of his life was that he never told his father he loved him.

When Mantle was four years old, the family moved to the nearby town of Commerce, Oklahoma. Mantle was an all-around athlete at Commerce High School, playing basketball as well as football (he was offered a football scholarship by the University of Oklahoma) in addition to his first love, baseball. His football playing nearly ended his athletic career, and indeed his life. Kicked in the shin during a game, Mantle's leg soon became infected with osteomyelitis, a crippling disease that would have been incurable just a few years earlier. A midnight ride to Tulsa, Oklahoma, enabled Mantle to be treated with newly available penicillin, saving his leg from amputation. He suffered from the effects of the disease for the rest of his life, and it probably led to many other injuries that hampered his accomplishments. Additionally, Mantle's osteomyelitic condition exempted him from military service, which caused him to become very unpopular with fans, as his earliest days in baseball coincided with the Korean War (though he was still selected as an all-star the year his medical exemption was given, and was known as the "fastest man to first base.")

His first semi-professional team was the Baxter Springs (Kan.) Whiz Kids. In 1948, Yankees' scout Tom Greenwade came to Baxter Springs to watch Mantle 's teammate, third baseman Billy Johnson, in a Whiz Kids game. During the game Mantle hit two homers, one righty and one lefty, into a river well past the ballpark's fences. Greenwade wanted to sign Mickey on the spot but, upon finding out that he was only 16 and still in high school, told him he would come back to sign him with the Yankees on his graduation day in 1949 which he did. Greenwade signed Mantle to a minor-league contract with the Yankees Class D team in Independence, Kan. Mantle signed for $400 to play the remainder of the season with an $1,100 signing bonus. Tom Greenwade was quoted in the press release announcing Mantle 's signing as saying that Mantle was the best prospect he'd ever seen. Because of his blinding speed, he was dubbed "The Commerce Comet." Mantle also played for the Yankee's farm club, the "Joplin Miners" in Joplin, Missouri. He would later invest in a Holiday Inn motel in that city, with his name attached to it.

On arrival at the Yankees April 17, 1951, he became the regular right fielder (playing only a few games in the infield between 1952 to 1955). Speaking of his prized rookie, Yankees manager Casey Stengel told SPORT magazine (June 1951) that, "He's got more natural power from both sides than anybody I ever saw." Joe DiMaggio, in his final season, called Mantle, "the greatest prospect I can remember." In his first game with the Yankees, Mantle wore uniform #6. In his first World Series Game, October 4, 1951, the Yankees were pitted against the Giants for what was Willie Mays's first World Series Game as well.

Mantle moved to center field in 1952, replacing Joe DiMaggio, who retired at the end of the 1951 season after one year playing alongside Mantle in the Yankees outfield. He played center field full-time until 1965, when he was moved to left field. His final two seasons were spent at first base. Among Mantle's many accomplishments are all-time World Series records for home runs (18), runs scored (42), and runs batted in (40).

Mantle also hit some of the longest home runs in Major League history. On September 10, 1960, he hit a ball left-handed that cleared the right-field roof at Tiger Stadium in Detroit and, based on where it was found, was estimated years later by historian Mark Gallagher to have traveled 565 feet (172 m). Another Mantle homer, this one hit right-handed off Chuck Stobbs at Griffith Stadium in Washington on April 17, 1953, was measured by Yankees traveling secretary Red Patterson (hence the term "tape-measure home run") to have traveled 565 feet (172 m). Though it is apparent that they are actually the distances where the balls ended up after bouncing several times, there is no doubt that they both landed more than 500 feet (152 m) from home plate. At least twice Mantle hit balls off the third-deck facade at Yankee Stadium, nearly becoming the only player (other than Negro Leagues star Josh Gibson) to hit a fair ball out of the stadium during a game. On May 22, 1963, against Kansas City's Bill Fischer, Mantle hit a ball that fellow players and fans claimed was still rising when it hit the 110-foot (34 m) high facade, then caromed back onto the playing field. It was later estimated by some that the ball could have traveled 620 feet (190 m) had it not been impeded by the ornate and distinctive facade. While physicists might question those estimates, on August 12, 1964, he hit one whose distance was undoubted: a center field drive that cleared the 22-foot (6.7 m) batter's eye screen, beyond the 461-foot (141 m) marker at the Stadium.

Although he was a feared power hitter from either side of the plate, Mantle considered himself a better right-handed hitter even though he had more home runs from the left side of the plate: 372 left-handed, 164 right-handed. That was due to Mantle having batted left-handed much more often, as the large majority of pitchers are right-handed. In addition, many of his left-handed home runs were struck at Yankee Stadium, a park that much friendlier to left-handed hitters than to right-handed hitters. When Mantle played for the Yankees, the distance to the right-field foul pole stood at a mere 296 feet (90 m), with markers in the power alleys of 344 and 407, while the left-field power alley ranged from 402 to 457 feet (139 m) from the plate.

In 1956, Mantle won the Hickok Belt as top professional athlete of the year. This was his "favorite summer," a year that saw him win the Triple Crown, leading the majors with a .353 batting average, 52 HR and 130 RBI on the way to his first of three MVP awards.

Also in 1956, Mantle made a (talking) cameo appearance in a song recorded by Teresa Brewer, "I Love Mickey", which extolled Mantle's power hitting. The song was included in one of the Base...[Message truncated]

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Aug 13

Mickey Mantle (continued)

Mantle may have been even more dominant in 1957, leading the league in runs and walks, batting a career-high .365 (second in the league to Ted Williams' .388), and hitting into a league-low five double plays. Mantle reached base more times than he made outs (319 to 312), one of two seasons in which he achieved the feat.

On January 16, 1961, Mantle became the highest-paid baseball player by signing a $75,000 contract. DiMaggio, Hank Greenberg and Ted Williams, who had just retired, had been paid over $100,000 in a season, and Ruth had a peak salary of $80,000. But Mantle became the highest-paid active player of his time.

During the 1961 season, Mantle and teammate Roger Maris chased Babe Ruth's single season home-run record. Five years earlier, in 1956, Mantle had challenged Ruth's record for most of the season and the New York press had been protective of Ruth on that occasion also. When Mantle finally fell short, finishing with 52, there seemed to be a collective sigh of relief from the New York traditionalists. Nor had the New York press been all that kind to Mantle in his early years with the team: he struck out frequently, was injury-prone, was a "true hick" from Oklahoma, and was perceived as being distinctly inferior to his predecessor in center field, Joe DiMaggio. Over the course of time, however, Mantle (with a little help from his teammate Whitey Ford, a native of New York's Borough of Queens) had gotten better at "schmoozing" with the New York media, and had gained the favor of the press. This was a talent that Maris, a blunt-spoken upper-Midwesterner, was never willing or able to cultivate; as a result, he wore the "surly" jacket for his duration with the Yankees. So as 1961 progressed, the Yanks were now "Mickey Mantle's team" and Maris was ostracized as the "outsider," and "not a true Yankee." The press seemed to root for Mantle and to belittle Maris. But Mantle was felled by an abscessed hip late in the season, leaving Maris to break the record.

In the bottom of the ninth inning of Game 3 of the 1964 World Series against the St. Louis Cardinals, Mickey Mantle blasted Barney Schultz's first pitch into the upper right field stands at Yankee Stadium, which won the game for the Yankees, 2-1.

Injruies slowed Mantle and the Yankees during the 1965 season, and they finished in 6th, 25 games behind the Minnesota Twins. Mantle hit .255 that season with only 19 home runs. After the 1966 season he was moved to first base with Joe Pepitone taking over his place in the outfield.

Mantle's last home run came on September 20, 1968 off Boston’s Jim Lonborg.

Mantle announced his retirement on March 1, 1969, and in 1974, as soon as he was eligible, he was inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame; his uniform number 7 was retired by the Yankees. (He had briefly worn uniform number 6, as a continuation of Babe Ruth's 3, Lou Gehrig's 4, and Joe DiMaggio's 5, in 1951, but his poor performance led to his temporary demotion to a minor league in mid-season. When he returned, Bobby Brown, who had worn number 6 before Mantle, had reclaimed it, so Mantle was given number 7 by Yankees longtime equipment manager, Pete Sheehy.) When he retired, the Mick was third on the all-time home run list with 536.

Despite being among the best-paid players of the pre-free agency era, Mantle was a poor businessman, having made several bad investments. His lifestyle would be restored to one of luxury, and his hold on his fans raised to an amazing level, by his position of leadership in the sports memorabilia craze that swept the USA beginning in the 1980s. Mantle was a prize guest at any baseball card show, commanding fees far in excess of any other player for his appearances and autographs. This popularity continues long after his death, as Mantle-related items far outsell those of any other player except possibly Babe Ruth, whose items, due to the distance of years, now exist in far smaller quantities.

Despite the failure of Mickey Mantle's Country Cookin' restaurants in the early 1970s, Mickey Mantle's Restaurant & Sports Bar opened in New York at 42 Central Park South (59th Street) in 1988. It became one of New York's most popular restaurants, and his original Yankee Stadium Monument Park plaque is displayed at the front entrance. Mantle let others run the business operations, but made frequent appearances.

In 1983, Mantle worked at the Claridge Resort and Casino in Atlantic City, N.J., as a greeter and community representative. Most of his activities were representing the Claridge in golf tournaments and other charity events. Mantle was suspended from baseball by Commissioner Bowie Kuhn on the grounds that any affiliation with gambling is grounds for being placed on the "permanently ineligible" list. Kuhn warned Mantle before he accepted the position that he would have to place him on the list if he went to work there. Hall of Famer Willie Mays, who had also taken a similar position, had already had action taken against him. Mantle accepted the position, regardless, as he felt the rule was "stupid." He was reinstated on March 18, 1985, by Kuhn's successor, Peter Ueberroth.

Mickey Mantle's career was fraught with injury. Beginning in high school he accumulated both acute and chronic bone and cartilage injuries in his legs. Applying thick wraps to both of his knees became a pre-game ritual, and by the end of his career simply swinging a bat caused him to fall to one knee in pain. Baseball scholars often ponder "what if" he had not been injured, and he was able to lead a healthy career.

As a 19 year old rookie in his first World Series, Mantle tore the cartilage in his right knee on a pop fly by Willie Mays while playing right field. Joe DiMaggio, in the last year of his career, was playing center field. Mays' pop-up was hit to deep right center, and as both Mantle and DiMaggio converged to make the catch, DiMaggio called for it at the last second, causing Mantle to suddenly stop short as his cleats caught a drainage cover in the outfield grass. His knee twisted awkwardly and he instantly fell. Witnesses say it looked "like he had been shot." He was carried off the field on a stretcher and spent the rest of the World Series watching from the hospital.

to be continued...

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Aug 13

Mickey Mantle (continued)

On December 23, 1951, he married Merlyn Johnson in their hometown of Commerce, Oklahoma; they had four sons. In an autobiography, Mantle said he married Merlyn not because he loved her, but because his domineering father told him to. While his drinking became public knowledge during his lifetime, the press kept his many marital infidelities quiet.

The couple's four sons were Mickey Jr. (born in 1953-2000), David (1955), Billy (1957-1994, whom Mickey named for Billy Martin, his best friend among his Yankee teammates) and Danny (1960). Like Mickey, Merlyn and the sons all became alcoholics, and Billy developed Hodgkin's disease as several previous Mantle men had. This led to him developing a dependence on prescription painkillers.

Mickey Mantle has four grandchildren. Mickey Jr. had a daughter, Mallory. David and his wife Marla have a daughter, Marilyn. Danny and his wife Kay have a son, Will, and a daughter, Chloe. Danny and Will played a father and son watching Mickey (played by Thomas Jane) hit a home run in the 2001 film "61*."

Mickey and Merlyn had been separated for 15 years when he died, but neither ever filed for divorce. Mantle lived with his agent, Greer Johnson. Johnson was taken to federal court in November 1997 by the Mantle family to stop her from auctioning many of Mantle's personal items, including a lock of hair, a neck brace and expired credit cards.

During the final years of his life, Mantle purchased a luxury condominium on Lake Oconee near Greensboro, Georgia, near Greer Johnson's home, and frequently stayed there for months at a time. He occasionally attended the local Methodist church, and sometimes ate Sunday dinner with members of the congregation. He was well-liked by the citizens of Greensboro, and seemed to like them in return. This was probably because the town respected Mantle's privacy, refusing either to talk about their famous neighbor to outsiders or to direct fans to his home. In one interview, Mickey stated that the people of Greensboro had "gone out of their way to make me feel welcome, and I've found something there I haven't enjoyed since I was a kid."

Well before he finally sought treatment for alcoholism, Mantle admitted that his hard living had hurt his playing and his family. His rationale was that the men in his family had all died young, so he expected to die young as well. "I'm not gonna be cheated," he would say. As the years passed, and he realized he had outlived the men in his family — not realizing that working in mines and inhaling lead and zinc dust aided Hodgkin's and other cancers as much as heredity did — he frequently used a line popularized by football legend Bobby Layne, a Dallas neighbor and friend of Mantle's who also died in part due to alcohol abuse: "If I'd known I was gonna live this long, I'd have taken a lot better care of myself."

Mantle's wife and sons all completed treatment for alcoholism, and told him he needed to do the same. He checked into the Betty Ford Clinic on January 7, 1994, after being told by a doctor that his liver was so badly damaged, "Your next drink could be your last." Also helping Mantle to make the decision to go to the Betty Ford Clinic was Pat Summerall, a sportscaster who had played for the New York Giants football team while they played at Yankee Stadium, and was now a recovering alcoholic and a member of the same Dallas-area country club as Mantle.

Shortly after completing treatment, his son Billy died on March 12, at age 36, of heart trouble, brought on by years of substance abuse. Despite the fears of those who knew him that this tragedy would send him back to drinking, he remained sober. Mickey Jr. later died of liver cancer on December 20, 2000, at age 47. Danny later battled prostate cancer.

Mantle spoke with great remorse of his drinking in a 1994 Sports Illustrated cover story. He said that he was telling the same old stories, and realizing how much of them involved himself and others being drunk, and he decided they weren't funny anymore. He admitted he had often been cruel and hurtful to family, friends and fans because of his alcoholism, and sought to make amends. He became a born-again Christian because of his former teammate Bobby Richardson, an ordained Baptist minister who shared his faith with him. After the bombing of the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building in Oklahoma City on April 19, 1995, he joined with fellow Oklahoman and Yankee legend Bobby Murcer to raise money for the victims.

Mantle received a liver transplant at Baylor University Medical Center in Dallas, on June 8, 1995, after his liver had been damaged by years of chronic alcoholism, cirrhosis and hepatitis C. In July, he had recovered enough to deliver a press conference at Baylor, and noted that many fans had looked to him as a role model. "This is a role model: Don't be like me," he said. He also established the Mickey Mantle Foundation to raise awareness for organ donations. Soon, he was back in the hospital, where it was found that his liver cancer spread throughout his body.

Though he was very popular, Mantle's liver transplant was a source of some controversy. Some felt that his fame had permitted him to receive a donor liver very quickly, bypassing other patients who had been waiting for much longer. Mantle's doctors insisted that the decision was based solely on medical criteria, but acknowledged that the very short wait created the appearance of favoritism.

Mantle died on August 13, 1995, at Baylor University Medical Center in Dallas. During the first Yankee home game after Mantle's death, Eddie Layton played "Somewhere Over the Rainbow" on the Hammond organ at Yankee Stadium because Mickey had once told him it was his favorite song. The Yankees played the rest of the season with black mourning bands topped by a small number 7 on their left sleeves.

Mantle was interred in the Sparkman-Hillcrest Memorial Park Cemetery in Dallas. In eulogizing Mantle, sportscaster Bob Costas described him as "a fragile hero to whom we had an emotional attachment so strong and lasting that it defied logic." Costas added: "In the last year of his life, Mickey Mantle, always so hard on himself, finally came to accept and appreciate the distinction between a role model and a hero. The first, he often was not. The second, he always will be. And, in the end, people got it."

to be continued...

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Aug 13

1996
» After failing to score in the first three innings, the Giants proceed to plate runs in each of their next six at bats, going on to defeat the Pirates, 12-10. Rick Wilkins' pinch-hitter grand slam in the 8th leads the Jints on to victory.

Oklahoma City's Rick Helling pitches a perfect game, winning 4–0 over Nashville.

1998
» Baltimore's Harold Baines becomes the all–time leader in RBIs by a DH when he drives in his 824th in a 7–4 win over the Indians. Hal McRae was the previous record–holder.

Orlando Hernandez sets a Yankee rookie record by striking out 13 in beating Texas, 2–0.

2000
Mike Sweeney becomes the fastest Royal player ever to reach 100 RBIs when he goes deep helping Kansas City defeat the Orioles, 10-5.

2000
» The Astros defeat the Phillies, 14-7, in the process hitting six home runs to tie a club mark. 1B Jeff Bagwell ties another club record by driving home seven runs.

2001
» Craig Biggio hits his 26th leadoff home run on the first pitch from Jason Bere and the Astros never look back, beating the Cubs, 9–5. Shane Reynolds is the winner, now 7–0 against Chicago. The Cubs fall out of first place as the Astros take over.

2002
» In Minnesota, the Twins' Rick Reed needs little help in shutting out the Baltimore Orioles, 6–0. Doug Mientkiewitz hits two homers and David Ortiz adds a home run and 2-run double. In the pre-game ceremonies celebrating Native American Heritage Day, golfer Notah Begay, a Navajo, chips the opening pitch. The losing pitcher is Scott Erickson, who had beaten his former team nine straight times over six seasons.

2003
After missing nearly three months with a groin injury, Mike Piazza makes a dramatic return to the New York lineup as he homers and drives in five runs on Italian Night at Shea Stadium. The backstop's 3-for-5 performance, including a home run in the third inning, RBI single in the fourth and a two-run single in the seventh, contributes to the Mets 9-2 victory over the Giants.

2003
Just as starting pitcher Javier Vazquez is about to throw a full count pitch to Rockies outfielder Jay Payton, a second inning hour-long blackout at the enclosed Olympic Stadium leaves leaves the fans and players in total darkness. Tomorrow the team arrives in New York on their off day just in time to experience a massive blackout which leaves more than 50 million Americans in the dark.

2004
At Seattle’s Boeing Field, Edgar Martinez is on hand to greet George W. Bush. The President, who had requested to meet the retiring designated hitter, exchanges autographed baseballs with man who routinely helped the Mariners beat his Rangers when the chief executive was the managing partner of Texas.

2004
At Citizens Bank Ballpark, Giants first baseman J.T. Snow hits three home runs in a 16-6 rout of the Phillies.

2006
During Cleveland's' 11-run first inning at Jacobs Field, Travis Hafner ties Don Mattingly's single-season mark for grand slams established in 1987. The Indians' designated hitter 35th homer of the season is the sixth one with the bases loaded.

2006
LA's Greg Maddux and SF's Jason Schmidt hook up in a classic West Coast pitcher's duel, reminiscence of match-ups of Koufax and Marichal, as the Dodgers beat the Giants, 1-0, thanks to Russell Martin's 10th inning walk-off home run.

2006
In the the Royals’ 13-0 loss against the Indians Jacobs Field, right-hander Luke Hudson gives up 11 runs in one-third of an nning. The first frame barrage is the result of eight hits, two walks and one error.

2007
Playing his 144th straight game without an error, Placido Polanco establishes a big league record for second baseman. The Detroit infielder, who hasn’t made an misplay since July 2 of last season, surpasses previous mark set by Luis Castillo, while playing for the Twins.

2007
For the first time in 1,303 games, Nomar Garciaparra of the Dodgers is ejected from a game. The 12-year veteran infielder, who is tossed by home plate umpire Tom Hallion for arguing a called third strike in the fourth inning, is restrained by first base coach Mariano Duncan as he continues to shout and points his bat toward the umpire.

resources for these postings are from nationalpastime.com, Wikipedia, nytimes.com, and baseballibrary.com

  • Reply to this Message
  • 8/13/08
  • purpledog
Bud thanks for the memories on Mickey Mantle. Growing up he was one of my favorites.
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  • 8/15/08
  • budwyche1

here's a link for some more memories of Mickey Mantle

www.theswearingens.com/mantle/

I like the poem on the home page

Our Heroes
(Author - unknown)

Our heroes wore wool in August.

Starters went nine.

And sluggers called their shots.

Our heroes spiked.

Pitchers threw inside.

And no one charged the mound.

Our heroes played on grass.

They stole home.

And they played every day.

Our heroes played baseball.

Remember?

enjoy!

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  • budwyche1

Aug 15

1905
» The A's Rube Waddell is the whole show today as he hurls a 5-inning no hitter over the Browns. The A's are ahead 2–0, when the rain starts pouring after the A's bat in the 5th. Waddell strikes out nine batters, and three more bounce out to Waddell. The one runner reaches on Rube's error.

Waddell grew up on the farmlands around Bradford, PA. "He often missed school," said his sister, "but I could always find him playing ball, fishing or following a fire engine." He pitched for a college team for one year, and for town teams at $25 a game, before signing his first contract with Louisville (NL) in 1897. He was playing for Pittsburgh when, unhappy with the stern discipline of manager Fred Clarke, he jumped the club. Clarke, preferring not to have to deal with the flaky hurler, let him go.

Connie Mack "borrowed" Waddell from the Pirates' Barney Dreyfuss for his Milwaukee team in the newly christened American League, which was still a minor league in 1900. On August 19, Milwaukee played a doubleheader against the White Sox. Waddell went all the way in the 17-inning opener, winning it 3-2 on his own triple. The two managers agreed the second game would be five innings. Mack, knowing Waddell was an avid fisherman, asked him, "...how would you like to go fishing at Pewaukee for three days instead of going with us to Kansas City? All you have to do is pitch the second game." Waddell threw a five-inning shutout.

Waddell joined Mack's Philadelphia Athletics in 1902 and went 24-7, leading the AL in strikeouts for the first of six straight seasons. In 1904 he struck out 349 - an AL record that stood for over 70 years until surpassed by Nolan Ryan. (He had been credited with 343 until after Bob Feller fanned 348 in 1946; further digging later increased Waddell's total to 349.) In 1905 he led the league with 26 wins, 8 relief wins, 46 appearances, 287 strikeouts, and a 1.48 ERA.

It was rumored that gamblers paid Waddell to fake an arm injury and sit out the 1905 World Series against the Giants. "That's ridiculous," maintained Mack. "Money meant nothing to him." In truth, Waddell had fallen on his left arm while horsing around with teammate Andy Coakley. It stiffened up overnight, and he didn't pitch again that season. Though he pitched four more ML seasons, he never again threw with the same snap.

It is believed Waddell never made more than $2,800 a year, and he spent money as fast as he got it. For a time the A's paid him in dollar bills, hoping to make his money last longer. He was forever borrowing or conning extra money out of Mack.

Waddell enjoyed waving his teammates off the field and then striking out the side. He actually did so only in exhibition games, since the rules prohibit playing with fewer than nine men on the field in regulation play. But, in a league game in Detroit, Waddell had his outfielders come in close and sit down on the grass. He struck out the side. Once the stunt almost backfired. Pitching an exhibition in Memphis, he took the field alone with his catcher, Doc Powers, for the last three innings. With two out in the ninth, Powers dropped a third strike, allowing the batter to reach first. The next two hitters patted flies that fell behind the mound. Waddell ran himself ragged but finally fanned the last man.

Waddell wrestled alligators in Florida, hung around in firehouses, married two women who then left him, and tended bar when he wasn't the saloon's best customer. He held up the start of games he was scheduled to pitch while he played marbles with children outside the park. There was a provision in Waddell's contract barring him from eating Animal Crackers in bed. In those days, two players had to share a double bed on the road, and Ossie Schreckengost was Waddell's catcher and roommate. "Schreck wouldn't sign unless he saw that clause in Waddell's contract," said Mack, "so I wrote it in there, and the Rube stuck to it."

Though Waddell was always a fan favorite, his erratic behavior and declining effectiveness strained the tolerance of his teammates. Some threatened not to report in the spring of 1908 unless Mack got rid of him. Waddell was shipped to the Browns. That July 29, he tied what was then the AL single-game strikeout record by fanning 16 of his former A's teammates.

By 1910 Waddell was back in the minors. He won 20 games for Joe Cantillon's Minneapolis (American Association) club in 1911. In the spring of 1912, he was staying at Cantillon's house in Hickman, Kentucky, when a nearby river flooded. Standing in icy water, Waddell helped pile sandbags on the embankments. The incident affected his health; though he went 12-6 that year, he collapsed while with Virginia (Northern League) in 1913 and landed in a sanatorium in San Antonio, Texas. He died there in 1914 on April Fool's Day.

For several years there was no monument on Waddell's grave. The president of the San Antonio ballclub told Connie Mack and John McGraw, whose Giants trained there. They raised enough money to put up a six-foot granite marker. Waddell was elected to the Hall of Fame by the Committee on Baseball Veterans in 1946.

to be continued...

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Aug 15

1914
» At the Polo Grounds, 32,000 watch as Lefty Tyler and Christy Mathewson throw goose eggs for nine innings. In the 10th, Red Smith singles and Hank Gowdy triples him home. Matty then wild pitches home Gowdy for 2–0 lead. New York loads the bases in the 10th with no outs, but Tyler slams the door with no Giants scoring. The Braves trail by three 1/2.

Brooklyn 1B Jake Daubert ties a major-league record by recording four sacrifice bunts in the 2nd game of a doubleheader sweep against Philadelphia, 8–4, and 13–5. Daubert, who can't run because of an injured ankle, also lays down two sacrifice bunts in the first game.

1916
» Boston's Babe Ruth outduels Nationals' ace Walter Johnson, winning 1–0 in 13 innings. Johnson allows just five hits through 12 innings, while Ruth surrenders just an infield single—by Clyde Milan in the 11th—from the 7th inning on. Milan also robs Ruth of a homer in the 12th by grabbing a ball heading into the RF stands. Ruth is now 3–0 in his meetings with Johnson.

1921
» A major-league record streak of 10 straight hits by the Browns' George Sisler is stopped by Detroit in the 4th inning, but he goes 2-for-3 with a 2-run homer in the 6th. The Browns win, 3–2.

1923
» Senators southpaw George Mogridge becomes the only hurler to steal home in extra innings when he scores an insurance run in the 12th in a 5-1 win over the White Sox.

1925
» Little Dickie Kerr, the southpaw who won two games for the White Sox in the 1919 WS, makes his first ML appearance since 1921. He has been playing semipro ball rather than accept Charles Comiskey's salary offer. When he relieves Red Faber in the third inning against the Tigers, play is stopped while admirers present him with a floral horseshoe. In two innings, he gives up three hits and walks 2. The White Sox go on to win 12-5.

1926
» The Braves are at Ebbets Field with Brooklyn's Hank DeBerry on 3B, Dazzy Vance on 2B, and Chick Fewster on 1B. Babe Herman drives the ball against the RF wall, and DeBerry scores. Vance holds up, then rounds 3B headed for home. Fewster stops at 3B. The RF throws home and traps Vance, who heads back to 3B. Herman slides into 3B as Fewster steps off. Herman is out for passing a base runner. Fewster, thinking he's out, too, walks off with Babe, and gets tagged out. Vance, still on 3B, later admits it was his fault, but Herman, who doubles into a double play, gets the blame.

1935
» Phillies 3B Johnny Vergez starts four DPs to equal the major-league record set by Pie Traynor.

1941
» Because of rain, the game between the Red Sox and the Senators is stopped in the eighth inning, with Washington winning 6-3. After a 40-minute wait the game is called. But because of Washington's failure to cover the field in case play is resumed, Boston manager Joe Cronin protests the game. The protest is upheld by league president Will Harridge and the forfeit goes to Boston.

1945
» Commissioner Happy Chandler sells World Series radio rights for $150,000 to Gillette. Ford had been the World Series sponsor since 1934, paying $100,000 annually.

Umpire Ernie Stewart is canned by American League President Will Harridge for "disloyalty." Stewart had complained about the pay and taken his case to Chandler. Bill McGowan is the top-paid umpire in the league at $9,000.

1948
» Before 72,468—the largest crowd of the season at Yankee Stadium—the A's sweep a pair from the Yanks by 5–3 scores and regain second place in the American League. The A's win the opener in 10 innings after Joe DiMaggio ties the score with his 20th homer of the year. Joe D also triples home a run in the extra frame but Lou Brissie preserves the win for Carl Scheib. The A's total 20 hits in the two games, including a triple and double by Sam Chapman. New York is now in 4th place, five games back.

A boyish Nebraskan, Southworth entered professional baseball against his father's wishes and spent four decades in the game as a player and manager. As a lefthanded-hitting outfielder, he displayed consistency at the plate, speed on the bases, and sure-handedness afield. He tied for the NL lead with 14 triples for Pittsburgh in 1919 and had his best all-around season with the Giants and World Champion Cardinals in 1926, batting .320 with 16 HR and 99 RBI. His three-run homer in Game Two of the '26 Series secured the victory for Grover Cleveland Alexander.

Southworth managed Rochester to the 1928 International League pennant and was promoted to the Cardinals the following year. Attempts to force his methods on former teammates led to dissension, and he was dismissed in July. Returning to Rochester, he won three successive pennants from 1929 to 1931, but because of bitterness and personal difficulties, he continued to incur the disfavor of the Cardinals organization. He coached the Giants in 1933, but was soon out of baseball.

Offered another chance by the Cardinals in 1935, Southworth worked his way back to the majors. Taking over in July of 1940 with St. Louis in sixth place, he guided the club to third. Under his direction, the Cardinals finished second in 1941 and then captured three successive NL pennants (1942-44) and two World Championships. He was a strict taskmaster, but displayed great skill with young players. A $50,000 offer lured him to the Braves in 1946, and two years later he led them to their first pennant since 1914.

In 13 years as a ML manager, Southworth only once finished in the second division. TSN named him Manager of the Year in 1941 and 1942. His .593 won-lost percentage places him sixth among ML pilots.

1950
» The Red Sox defeat the Athletics 8–3 and 9–4 to begin a streak in which they reel off 27 of 30, propelling themselves back into the pennant race. Walt Dropo is hospitalized, however, after being beaned by the A's Hank Wyse.

to be continued...

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  • budwyche1

Aug 15

1951
» Giants P Jim Hearn defeats the Dodgers 3–1 as Willie Mays makes a miraculous play in the 8th. With the score 1–1 and Billy Cox on 3rd, Mays makes a running catch of a Carl Furillo drive in deep right CF and whirls counterclockwise to throw out the astonished Cox at home. Wes Westrum's 2-run homer off Ralph Branca in the 8th provides the two-run margin. Hearn allows just six hits, all singles, as the Giants move to 10 1/2 behind Brooklyn.

Al Rosen belts a first inning grand slam to jump start the Indians to a 9–4 win over the Browns, their 13th in a row. For Rosen, it is his 4th slam of the year, just the 9th player to accomplish the feat. Ned Garver gives up seven runs in the first inning in losing to Early Wynn.

1952
» D ick Marlowe of the Buffalo Bisons pitches the 2nd perfect game in the history of the International League, against Baltimore.

1953
» 3B Ransom Jackson of the Cubs grounds into 3 DPs against the Braves' as the Cubs lose 2-0. Jackson ties a NL record, later eclipsed by Joe Torre.

1955
» Mickey Mantle homers from both sides of the plate in the same game for the second time in his career, tying the major-league mark. The Yanks beat the Orioles 12-6 in game two and sweep the doubleheader to move back into first.

1956
» The Dodgers and Giants draw 26,385 for a night-game record at Jersey City. A Willie Mays HR is the only scoring as Johnny Antonelli shuts out the Dodgers 1-0.

1960
» Behind Art Ditmar's 5-hitter and Mickey Mantle's two home runs, off Jerry Walker and Hoyt Wilhelm, New York cops a 4–3 win and first place in the American League. The 2nd home run comes after C Clint Courtney drops a Mantle foul pop-up. Baltimore's loss is only its 2nd in the last 15 games. Baltimore and Chicago now trail by a half-game.

In the first of two games at Crosley Field, Frank Robinson and Eddie Mathews exchange punches after Robbie slides in hard at 3B in the 7th inning. Robbie comes out on the short end with a swollen eye, bloody nose, and jammed thumb, but comes back in the nitecap with a double and homer to lead the Reds to a 4–0 win. Bob Purkey wins the shutout, despite allowing 11 hits.

1961
» Roger Maris hits his 46th homer, off Chicago's Juan Pizarro, for New York's only run in a 2–1 loss to the visiting White Sox. Pizarro allows just four hits. Whitey Ford loses in his bid for his 21st win.

1962
» Pinch-hit home runs by the Mets Choo Choo Coleman (6th inning) and Jim Hickman (8th) tie the major-league record for pinch home runs by one club in one game, but the Mets still lose to the Phils, 8–7, in 13 innings. Winning pitcher Chris Short singles and scores the winning run. The Phils cop the opener, 9–3 behind a Callison homer and two by Demeter.

1964
» Mayor Daley declares "Ernie Banks Day" in Chicago and 26,000 fans cheer the Cubs' slugger. Banks then goes hitless as Pittsburgh wins 5–4.

1965
» Washington 3B Ken McMullen ties an American League record by starting four DPs in a 4–2 win, as the Senators complete a 3-game sweep of Baltimore.

Pinch-hit home runs by Max Alvis in the 9th inning and Leon Wagner in the 11th give Cleveland a 6–4 win against Minnesota. Two pinch-hit home runs in one game ties the ML record.

The Japanese community of San Francisco holds Masanori Murakami Day at Candlestick Park to honor the first Japanese player to have reached the American major leagues. Ordinarily a reliever, Murakami makes his first ML start as the Giants outslug the Phillies, 15–9. He was successful in limited use as a reliever for the Giants, but his U.S. career was cut short when the Japanese government, afraid that its country's teams would be decimated should others follow Murakami's path, demanded that he be returned.

1968
» At Oakland, the Yanks edge the A's, 4–3. Blue Moon Odom gives up a triple to Tom Tresh, a walk, then serves up a three-run homer to Mickey Mantle for the difference.

1969
» Don Sutton (15-11) opens a 9-game eastern swing for Los Angeles with a 9–2 win at Montreal. The Dodgers remain two games behind the first-place Reds. Montreal reliever Roy Face makes his final ML appearance, a record 657th consecutive relief effort (excluding his two games with the Tigers).

1970
» In a 5–4 Reds win over the Phillies, Lee May drives in all the runs for Cincinnati. His 2nd homer in the bottom of the 9th ties the game and his single in the 14th wins it. Pete Rose is 0-for-7 with five straight K's. The Phils Billy Champion is the losing pitcher, but all is not lost. Champion picks up a PCL win today as Eugene completes a suspended game in which he is the victor.

1971
» Vida Blue raises his record to 22-4 as the A's beat the Yankees, 6–4. Blue scatters 10 hits and scores the tie breaking run on a wild pitch.

1975
Earl Weaver is ejected twice by umpire Ron Luciano. The fiery Baltimore manager is thrown out in the first game of a doubleheader and is tossed again before the start of the second game.

to be continued…

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  • budwyche1

Aug 15

1976
» On Buddy Harrelson's wedding day, he scores the only run as the Mets nip the Reds 1–0. He gets married a few hours after the game.

1977
» In a 2–1 win over Kansas City, Boston's Jim Rice hits a 3rd inning double and becomes the first Boston player since Ted Williams in 1939 to hit 20 homers, 20 doubles and 10 triples in a season. Between Williams and Rice, only Charlie Keller (1946), Joe DiMaggio (1948, '50) and Mickey Mantle (1955) had reached those levels.

1979
» Eddie Murray, no gazelle, surprises the White Sox with a 12th-inning steal of home to give the Mike Flanagan and the Orioles a 2–1 win.

1980
» Oakland's Rick Langford (13-9) defeats the Mariners 11–3 for his 17th consecutive complete game, the most in the majors since Robin Roberts' 20 in a row in 1953.

1983
» Braves Bob Horner, who was hitting .303 with 20 home runs and 68 RBI, breaks his right wrist sliding into 2B during a 4–0 loss to the Padres and will be sidelined for the rest of the season. In Atlanta, the injury is widely attributed to the "Chief Noc-A-Homa Jinx," which seems to strike whenever the Braves remove their mascot's outfield teepee in order to sell more tickets.

1984
» After a 51/2 year absence, Pete Rose is reunited with his hometown Cincinnati Reds when the Expos trade him for infielder Tom Lawless. The Reds immediately name him player-manager, replacing Vern Rapp.

1987
» At the Pan American games in Indianapolis, the U.S.A. and Cuba are tied with two outs in the 9th when Ty Griffin hits a 2-run home run to win it. For Cuba it is their first loss in 20 years of Pan Am competition.

1989
» Rangers Charlie Hough pitches his 2nd career one-hitter and gets his 2nd career one-hit loss, as he loses 2–0 to Seattle. Hough walks 5, balks, and throws a wild pitch, while the Rangers collect 13 hits but no runs, one hit shy of the major-league record while being shut out.

In his 2nd start since returning to the major leagues after cancer treatment, the Giants Dave Dravecky breaks his pitching arm while throwing to Tim Raines in the 6th inning of a 3–2 San Francisco win. The bone will heal but Dravecky will break it again during the Giants on-field celebration when the Giants clinch the pennant. Dravecky will not pitch again in the major leagues.

1990
» Mark McGwire hits a game-winning grand slam in the bottom of the 10th to give Oakland a 6–2 win over Boston. He becomes the first player to hit 30 home runs in each of his first four seasons.

1990
Phillie Terry Mulholland faces just twenty-seven hitters no-hitting the Giants 6-0 as a double play erases only batter to reach base due to third baseman Charlie Hayes' throwing error. It is the record eighth no-hitter of the season surpassing the previous record of seven set in 1908 and tied in 1917.

1991
» Yankees 1B Don Mattingly is benched and fined $250 for refusing to cut his shoulder-length hair, but the Yankees still beat Kansas City, 5–1. He will get one two days later, and the hair will eventually be auctioned off for $3,000 to benefit a children's charity. Mattingly is not alone; Steve Farr, Matt Nokes, and Pascual Perez have all been told their hair length violates club policy. Mel Hall, who wears his hair in a small ponytail before and after games, is warned his appearance is "borderline."

1992
» Texas P Bobby Witt walks 10 Tigers in 4 2/3 innings, as Detroit strolls past the Rangers, 10-3. No one has walked this many in this few innings: Randy Johnson walked 10 on May 1 of this year and Witt passed 10 on September 1, 1990.

1996
» P Bobby Seay, the top pick of the Chicago White Sox in the June draft, is declared a free agent after the team fails to tender him a formal contract within 15 days of the draft, a violation of major league rules. Seay is the 1st player in the 32-year history of the draft to be declared a free agent in the summer he was selected.

1997
» Mark McGwire cracks a 2-run homer in the 9th to tie the game for St. Louis and Delino DeShields hits a leadoff homer in the 12th as the Cards edge the Braves, 3–2. For McGwire, who also walks four times, it is his 4th homer in four games.

The Orioles and Mariners split a day-night twinbill, the O's taking the opener, 4–3 and the M's the nitecap, 8–3. Randy Johnson drops the first game, despite striking out 13 batters; he has now struck out 32 in two games to tie Luis Tiant (1968), Nolan Ryan (1974) and Dwight Gooden (1984).

to be continued...

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Aug 15

1998
» In the Reds–Expos game, two pairs of brothers face each other, and three out of four go deep. Vladimir Guerrero and Wilton Guerrero homer for the Expos while Bret Boone hits a solo shot for the Reds. Aaron Boone followed with a strikeout, but the Reds win 6–4.

1999
» The Mets defeat the Giants, 12-5, behind Kenny Rogers' complete game victory. It is the 1st complete game of the year for the Mets, who had gone 139 consecutive games without a complete game. They fall one short of the major-league record of 140 set by the Angels earlier this season.

The Angels defeat the Tigers, 10-2, as Chuck Finley becomes the first pitcher in history to strike out four batters in an inning twice in his career. Finley previously fanned four Yankees in Anaheim's game with the New Yorkers on May 12. Both instances occurred in the 1st inning.

2001
» The Mets lose their 5th straight game, falling to the Padres by a score of 2–1. SD's Trevor Hoffman gets the save, becoming the 14th pitcher in history to reach the milestone of 300 saves. He also ties John Wetteland as the 2nd–fastest to reach the mark.

2005
Randy Winn becomes 21st player in Giants history to hit for the cycle. The fleet flychaser, obtained from the Mariners two weeks ago, singles in the first, homers in the third, doubles in the fourth and completes the feat with a triple in the sixth inning.

2005
Felix Hernandez becomes the first teenager to strike out at least 10 batters since Doc Gooden accomplished the feat with the Mets in May of 1984. The 18-year old Mariner rookie righty K’s 11 batters as the Mariners' maul the Royals, 11-3.

2006
Joining Jim Hickman (1965), Dave Kingman (1978, Caudelll Washington (1980), Darryl Strawberry (1985), Gary Carter (1985) and Edgardo Alfonzo (1999), Jose Reyes, in an 11-4 loss to the Phillies at Citizens Bank Park becomes the seventh Mets player to hit three homers in a game. Like all his predecessors his trifecta is accomplished on the road.

2006
With the 4-0 blanking of the Marlins, the Dodgers win their sixth consecutive game and 17th in 18 games. The stretch is the team's best run since the Brooklyn Superbas went 20-1 in 1899.

2007
The Devil Rays have come to terms with their first overall selection in the June first-year player draft, left-handed pitcher David Price. The Vanderbilt University (11-1, 2.63) southpaw signs a six-year major league contract which could be worth as much as $11.25 million if the college junior sticks in the bigs for the length of the deal.

resources for these postings are from nationalpastime.com, Wikipedia, and baseballibrary.com

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  • budwyche1

Aug 18

1900
» Veteran manager Pat Tebeau resigns from the Cards. When 3B John McGraw refuses the job, the Robison brothers, the St. Louis owners, pick Louie Heilbroner, the 4' 9" Cardinals business manager, to run the team for the remainder of 1900. Many of the players refuse to take orders from the diminutive Heilbroner, and it will be McGraw who is really in command. Heilbroner will return to the front office the following year and in 1910 he will begin publishing The Baseball Blue Book.

1902
» The first unassisted triple play ever in a professional game is executed by 1B Hal O'Hagan, of the Rochester Broncos (IL) against Jersey City.

1906
» The Cubs turn back the visiting Giants, 6-2 behind Three Finger Brown. Christy Mathewson has an off day for New York, allowing 12 hits, three by his nemesis Joe Tinker.

Wee Willie Keeler is struck out for only the 2nd time this season, both times by spitballer Ed Walsh of the White Sox.

Wee Willie had a catchy nickname, extraordinary statistics, membership on one of the game's great teams, and a formula for success that became baseball's classic axiom. A two-time batting champion as the Baltimore Orioles' right fielder, Keeler advised simply, "Keep your eye on the ball and hit 'em where they ain't."

Keeler arrived from Binghamton (Eastern League) as a hard-hitting lefthanded third baseman in 1892, the last year pitchers threw from 50 feet. But it was not until Ned Hanlon acquired him for Baltimore in 1894 that he blossomed into an excellent outfielder. The 5'4-1/2" 140-lb Keeler was Hanlon's leadoff man through nine glorious years in Baltimore and Brooklyn, five as pennant winners, three in second place. He was a consistent contributor to those successes, batting .378 over the nine-year period and averaging 215 hits and 134 runs. While there was a surge of high-average hitting as pitchers adjusted to the new 60'6" distance to the plate, Keeler hit .355 or better until 1902 and did not drop below .300 until 1907.

In 1897, at age twenty-five, Wee Willie enjoyed his finest season. He batted .432, the third-highest mark in ML history, and led the league with 243 hits in only 128 games. He also hit safely in 44 consecutive games, an NL record since equaled by only Pete Rose.

Although the native Brooklynite jumped to the New York Highlanders in 1903, becoming one of few to play for three New York teams, he is best remembered for his years in Baltimore. His contemporaries recognized him as one of the game's great bat handlers, a precise bunter, and place hitter as well as a master of the "Baltimore chop" off the hardened dirt in front of home plate. He choked his short bat almost halfway up, and with a quick wrist snap would punch the ball over the infielders' heads. He was extremely fast down the line and worked the hit-and-run expertly with teammate John McGraw. Aggressive and opportunistic, Keeler remained cheerful and friendly, without a trace of McGraw's unpleasant anger. A bachelor who prospered in real estate when his playing days ended, he was elected to the Hall of Fame in 1939.

1907
» Detroit's first Sunday game at home since 1902, and the first at Bennett Field, is a 16-3 win over New York.

1909
» Giants player-coach Arlie Latham steals 2B in the Giants' 14-1 laugher over the Phillies. At 50, he is the oldest player to swipe a base.

1910
» In a Three-I League game at Davenport, Red Faber of Dubuque pitches a 3-0 perfect game against Davenport. The 21-year-old Faber is still three years away from the majors.

Faber was a steady, even-tempered spitballer whose long life in the second division probably kept him from the select 300-win club. With Chicago's lineup decimated by the loss of the Black Sox stars, Faber endured 13 seasons in or below fifth place, and only three at .500 or above. His lifetime winning percentage of .545 was achieved mostly with teams below .500.

Faber acquired his spitter in 1911, after a sore arm ruined early tryouts with the Pirates. Sold to Des Moines (Western League), he had two sterling seasons, and was purchased by the White Sox for $3,500. The Sox and Giants scheduled a world tour after the 1913 season. Faber, who had not yet pitched an inning of major league ball, was loaned to the Giants when Christy Mathewson declined to take the trip. Faber won four exhibitions against his future teammates, and began his 20-year, one-team career in 1914.

He was the pitching star of the 1917 Series win over the Giants, missed most of 1918 in the Navy, and returned to help win the 1919 pennant with 11 victories. He was on the bench for the scandalous Series, however, with recurring arm trouble and the flu.

Faber's peak years were 1921 and 1922, when he won 25 and 21 games while the Sox were finishing seventh and fifth. He led the league in ERA and complete games both years. From 1914 through 1923, he had ten consecutive winning seasons. But he was not overpowering. His 1,471 strikeouts are far down the all-time list, yet he always claimed success against Ruth and Cobb. Like many spitballers, he threw the spitter sparingly, for contrast, and with a variety of motions. Always poised, the excellent control pitcher became increasingly sager. In his 4,087 innings, he allowed only 110 HR (one every 37 innings), and hit only 104 batters (one every 39).

His oddest statistical feats came as a batter. A .134 switch hitter, in 1915 he walked seven times in a row. Twice, he made the most of his rare on-base appearances by stealing home.

Faber served several seasons as a White Sox coach. After baseball, he worked until his eighties on a Cook County Highway Department survey team.

1912
» In New York, the Tigers beat the Yankees, 9–4. Ty Cobb steals home in the 1st inning, the 3rd time this season he's swiped home and all in the first inning.

to be continued...

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Aug 18

1913
» Philadelphia's Erskine Mayer sets an NL mark by surrendering nine consecutive hits to the Cubs in the 9th inning of their game. The Cubs score six runs to win, 10–4.

1915
» The new Braves Field opens in Boston. An estimated 46,500 jam the park to see the Braves and D ick Rudolph beat the Cards, 3–1.

Wilbur Good becomes the only Cub ever to steal 2B, 3B, and home in the same inning. He does it in the 6th frame of a 9–0 beating of Brooklyn.

Asahi Shimbun, a Japanese newspaper, sponsors the first National High School baseball tournament. It is an instant success and will continue every August (except during W W II) to the present. It will often be called the Koshien Tournament, after the stadium near Osaka where the games will be played starting in 1924.

1929
» Forty-year-old Braves catcher Hank Gowdy, who last appeared in the majors in 1925, goes 4-for-4 to lead the Braves to a 10–9 win over the Reds.

Gowdy joined the 1910 Giants at age 20, was dealt to the Braves in 1911, and spent the next twelve seasons in Boston. The 6'2" righthander was a starting catcher from 1914 through 1916 and batted .545 with a homer and three RBI to lead the "miracle" Braves to a 1914 World Series sweep over the Athletics. He caught the no-hitters of George Davis (9/9/1914) and Tom Hughes (6/16/1916). Gowdy was the first ML player to enlist for WWI and saw considerable action in France. After he returned in 1919, he shared Boston's catching duties before he was reacquired by the Giants in 1923. Gowdy was a goat in the Giants' 1924 WS loss to Washington; he tripped over his mask and missed a pop-up, which led to the Series-winning run. Dropped by the Giants in 1925, Gowdy returned to the Braves for limited duty in 1929-30.

1930
» Woody English scores five runs and Hack Wilson hits his 42nd home run, as the Cubs crush the Phillies 17–3. Pat Malone contributes another home run and goes the distance for the win.

1931
» In New York's 5–4 loss at Detroit, Lou Gehrig is hitless as he plays his 1,000th consecutive game. He is 307 short of Everett Scott's record streak.

Paul Waner chalks up five hits to lead Pittsburgh to a 14–5 win over the Phils.

1938
» When Detroit's Billy Rogell walks his first time up, it is his seventh consecutive base on balls, a new AL record.

Carl Hubbell is forced to leave the mound in a 5-3 loss to the Dodgers when he experiences sharp elbow pains in his pitching arm.

1940
» The Sunday New York Daily News publishes a shocking article written by its sports editor, Jimmy Powers, suggesting that the 5th place Yankees, had been hit by a "mass polio epidemic." Powers charges that Lou Gehrig's "infantile paralysis" had infected the other Yankees, accounting for the team's uncharacteristic reversal of form. The article immediately causes a sensation among readers and fans. At Gehrig's request, Milton Eisenberg, a Brooklyn attorney, brings suit for $1 million against Powers and newspaper charging that Gehrig's reputation and credit had been hurt and that the article had caused him considerable mental anguish. Other angry Yankees, including Bill Dickey, also file suit against the News, causing the newspaper to issue a public apology on September 26, The three and a half column story appears under the headline "OUR APOLOGIES TO LOU GEHRIG AND THE YANKEES." In his apology, Powers admits he had no business getting 'snarled up in medical controversy," stating "Gehrig has no communicable disease and was not suffering from the mysterious polio germ that supposedly played havoc with the Yankee ball club." Lou is a personal hero, Powers adds. "Hurting his feelings was far from my mind.'

Polio Scare
(article from Time Magazine - Sept 2, 1940)

Last week, in Manhattan's tabloid Sunday News, Sports Editor Jimmy Powers offered his 3,400,000 readers a bloodcurdling sensation as a possible explanation for the surprising collapse of the New York Yankees.

Under the scarehead Has 'Polio' Hit the Yankees?, Editor Powers demanded: "Has the mysterious 'polio' germ which felled Lou Gehrig also struck his former teammates, turning a once great team into a floundering non-contender? According to overwhelming opinion of the medical profession, poliomyelitis, similar to infantile paralysis, is communicable. The Yanks were exposed to it at its most acute stage. They played ball with the afflicted Gehrig, dressed and undressed in the locker room with him, traveled, played cards and ate with him. Isn't it possible some of them also became infected?"

To add weight to his fantastic diagnosis, "Doctor" Powers quoted medical textbooks, cited cases of other athletes who had been "struck down in the dark by the dread 'polio' germ." He dressed up his four-column story with a full-bosomed photograph of Diver Georgia Coleman (stricken with infantile paralysis three years ago), pathetic pictures of onetime Iron Man Gehrig "before and after," and a lurid drawing of "the Yanks" smitten by a terrifying plague.

Actually, Gehrig never was "felled" by the polio germ. His ailment, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (TIME, March 25), is something quite different, is not communicable. The New York Yankees hurriedly disproved "Doctor" Powers' quack diagnosis by winning six games in a row and moving up to third place in the American League pennant race—only six games behind the league-leading Cleveland Indians. Lou Gehrig's rebuttal was more direct. Saying that he is now "a pariah whom many people shun," honest, earnest Lou Gehrig, who has been practically canonized since retiring from baseball last summer, last week brought suit for $1,000,000.

to be continued...

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Aug 18

1942
» After going 1–6 before the All-star break, Carl Hubbell posts his 8th straight win, beating the Braves 10–2. The 39-year-old veteran is backed by Mel Ott's three hits, including a home run into the LF stands at the Polo Grounds.

1945
» Scheduled demonstrations at the Polo Grounds and Ebbets Field to end segregation in organized baseball are called off.

1950
» A's lefty Lou Brissie gives up just one Yankee hit in the last five innings, but it's a critical one. With the score 2–2 in the top of the ninth, Joe DiMaggio cracks his 22nd HR of the year to give the third place New Yorkers a 3–2 win and hand the Mackmen their sixth straight loss.

1952
» The NL suspends Leo Durocher for five days and fines him $100 for a row with an umpire.

1956
» Redlegs OF Bob Thurman hits three consecutive HRs; Ted Kluszewski and Frank Robinson add two each, and Wally Post, one, in a 13-4 win over Milwaukee at Crosley Field. The eight HRs tie a major-league record.

1959
» At Milwaukee, the Dodgers stake Don Drysdale to a 5–1 lead after five innings, but the Braves chip away and finally tie it with a run in the 9th. The Dodgers make it 6–5 in the 11th but Hank Aaron takes Drysdale deep to tie it up. Drysdale is finally relieved and LA wins it in the 13th, 7–6.

Branch Rickey resigns as chairman of the Pirates to become president of the Continental League.

1960
» Facing just 27 batters, Lew Burdette pitches a 1–0 no-hitter against the Phillies. Tony Gonzalez, the only Phil to reach base, is hit by a Burdette pitch in the 5th inning but erased on a DP. The Milwaukee pitcher also scores the only run of the game.

Bob Sprout sets a Midwest League record with 22 strikeouts, and pitches a 7-inning no-hitter as Decatur defeats Waterloo 3–0. The 18-year-old lefty needs a dropped foul ball for his chance at the record. Sprout will pitch just one game in the ML, with the Angels in 1961.

1962
» Kansas City tops the Yanks for the 2nd day in a row, 5–4. Again, Mickey Mantle homers in the losing cause.

1965
» The Braves take first place when Tony Cloninger beats St. Louis, 5–3. Hank Aaron of the Braves hits a home run off Curt Simmons, but has it nullified when umpire Chris Pelekoudas says Aaron stepped out of the batter's box when he made contact.

In a 3–2 Orioles' win over the Red Sox, Brooks Robinson hits into his 3rd triple play, tying the record of George Sisler, who banged into triple plays in 1921, 1922, and 1926.

1966
» Pittsburgh 3B Jose Pagan ties the modern National League record for errors in an inning with 3, but Pittsburgh coasts to a 9–3 win over the Mets.

1967
» A baseball tragedy occurs when Tony Conigliaro of the Red Sox is beaned by the Angels Jack Hamilton. Hit on the left cheekbone, just below the eye socket, Conigliaro will miss the rest of 1967 and all of 1968. He was hitting .267 with 20 home runs and 67 RBI in 95 games. Despite the loss of Tony C, the Red Sox will sweep the 4-game series with the Angels. The sweep will still leave Minnesota in 1st place, with Boston, Detroit, and Chicago all within two games.

Lew Krausse of the A's is suspended by owner Charlie Finley for rowdyism and conduct unbecoming a ML player.

1968
» In the opener of a doubleheader at Wrigley Field, umpire Chris Pelekoudas calls three illegal pitches on Cubs P Phil Regan, twice allowing a retired batter to hit again. Pete Rose singles after a called 3rd strike. Pelekoudas can't find any evidence on Regan and bases his calls on "the flight of the ball." The Cubs, who lose both games, 2–1 and 6–3, protest the ump's calls. The next day Warren Giles meets with Cubs' officials and orders Pelekoudas to apologize to the church-going Regan, whom he calls a "fine Christian gentleman." However, at the ML winter meetings, the Rules Committee will further amend the spitball rule to allow an ump to call an illegal pitch based on the flight of the ball.

1972
» Mickey Lolich regains first place for the Tigers as he bests the Angels and Nolan Ryan 2–0. It is Lolich's 19th win.

1976
» The Angels nip the Tigers 5–4 in 11 innings. Nolan Ryan works the first 10, fanning 17.

In the Yankees 8–6 win over the Rangers, Roy White homers from each side of the plate.

1977
» Dodger P Don Sutton throws his 5th one-hitter, tying the National League record, as he blanks the Giants, 7–0. The lone hit is Marc Hill's two-out single in the 8th.

to be continued...

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Aug 18

1979
» After six straight wins, the 3rd place Brewers lose to Texas 7–3. But the 49,172 fans give Milwaukee a new season record. They'll finish in 2nd place with a team record 1,918, 343 in attendance.

1982
» In the completion of a game suspended the previous day after 17 innings, the Dodgers beat the Cubs 2–1 in 21 innings despite running out of position players and having to use pitchers Fernando Valenzuela and Bob Welch in the outfield. Jerry Reuss pitches the final four innings for the win, then starts the regularly scheduled game and wins again 7–4.

The Reds play 14 innings and overcome a 5–1 Mets lead to win 7–6. Cesar Cedeno singles in the winning run. Tomorrow, they will win in the 10th against the Mets, 3–1, on Ron Oester's home run.

1982
Passing Hank Aaron, Pete Rose becomes the all-time leader in plate appearances when he steps up the plate for the 13,941st time.

1983
» In the continuation of the "Pine Tar Game," Hal McRae strikes out for the last KC out and Dan Quisenberry retires the Yankees in order in the bottom of the 9th to preserve the Royals' 5–4 victory. The conclusion takes just 12 minutes (and 16 pitches) and, as the only game scheduled at the Stadium, is witnessed by a crowd of 1,245. An odd feature of the game is lefty Don Mattingly playing 2B and pitcher Ron Guidry in CF, as the Yanks try to cover all the options.

1984
» Detroit's Juan Berenguer goes eight 1/3 innings and strikes out 12 to give the Tigers a 4–3 victory over the Mariners. Kirk Gibson drives in three runs with his 20th homer of the year, and becomes the first Tiger ever to reach 20-20 in homers and steals. Gibson's homer is his 15th game-winning RBI this year.

1989
» Andre Dawson gets his 2,000th career hit in the Cubs' 6–5 loss to Houston. Houston scores twice in the 9th against four Cub relievers. After the game, the Astros trade Billy Hatcher, who had a pinch single in the 9th today, to the Pirates for Glenn Wilson.

Dallas Green is fired as manager of the Yankees and replaced by former SS Bucky Dent. It is the 17th time the Yankees have changed managers since George Steinbrenner took over the club in 1973.

In a 9–2 Toronto win, Baltimore SS Cal Ripken plays in his 1,208th consecutive game, passing Steve Garvey for the 3rd longest streak in ML history, George Bell leads Toronto with two singles, a double and a home run.

1995
» In a slugfest at new Coors Field, the Cubs defeat the Rockies by a score of 26-7. A two 1/2 hour rain delay interrupted the contest which takes more than six hours to play. OF Luis Gonzalez drives home six runs for Chicago while Sammy Sosa goes 4-for-4, with four RBIs and four runs scored. Several ML records are tied by the Cubs: nine teammates each score two or more runs (Scott Servais and Sosa score 4, while Mark Grace plates 3); 14 Cubs hit safely, and 26 RBIs (ties the National League mark) are collected. The Cubs now have scored 20 or more runs 39 times, extending their ML record. Kevin Foster pitches the first three innings for Chicago, allowing only a Andres Galarraga homer before departing to rest with the Cubs up 9–1. Anthony Young picks up an easy win with one 1/3 innings of relief.

Mariners' 3B Mike Blowers hits a grand slam and a 3-run homer in his first two at bats to plate seven runs, in Seattle's 9-3 win over Boston. Blowers earlier drove in eight runs in a game.

Cards reliever Tom Henke earns a save in a 4–3 win over the Braves. It is his 300th save, making him just the 6th pitcher to reach that mark.

Yankees announcer, and former SS, Phil Rizzuto retires as team broadcaster after 39 years at the mike, reportedly because WPIX-TV refused to allow him to miss a game to attend teammate Mickey Mantle's funeral. Rizzuto eventually will return for the 1996 season.

1996
» Cleveland 3B Jim Thome strokes four hits, including a pair of homers, and drives home six runs to lead the Indians to an 11–3 victory over the Tigers.

In a wild contest in New York, the Mariners jump out to an 8-0 lead over the Yankees. The New Yorkers strike back with seven runs in their half of the 4th inning to edge within 1. Seattle scores twice in the 6th, but the Yankees ties the score in the bottom half of the inning with three runs of their own. The score remains tied at 10-10 going into the 12th inning. Seattle scores three in the top half of the inning, two on 1B Paul Sorrento's 2nd homer of the game. New York fights back with two in the bottom of the inning, but falls one shy, losing, 13-12. The Yankees remain five 1/2 games ahead of Baltimore in the American League East, while Seattle stays six games behind Texas in 2nd place in the AL West.

to be continued...

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Aug 18

1997
» The Rangers defeat the Brewers, 2-0, behind a combined 1-hitter by Rick Helling (8 innings) and John Wetteland (1 inning). Francisco Vina's single is Milwaukee's only hit.

1998
» Greg Maddux wins his 200th game as the Braves double up the Giants, 8–4. Maddux allows one earned run to lower his National League best ERA to 1.65. In a rarity, the Braves collect nine hits—all doubles. Gerald Williams, Danny Bautista and Walt Weiss have two apiece, while Eddie Perez drives in three runs with another.

2000
After beating out a potential double play ball to prolong a five-run ninth inning rally which ties the game, Angel flycatcher Darin Erstad makes a 10th inning game-saving catch and follows it with a game-winning homer in the 11th to beat Yankees, 9-8.

2001
» The Rangers pound the Blue Jays, 12–5, scoring eight runs in the 9th inning. C Ivan Rodriguez's grand slam is the big blow for Texas.

Danny Almonte, pitching for the Bronx Little League entry, the Rolando Paulino all-stars, hurls the first perfect game since 1957 in the Little League World Series, beating the eventual winner, Apopka, FL, 2–0. The Bronx team will win next week, but all the victories will be stripped from them when an investigation proves a number of rules infractions, not the least of which is that Almonte is too old. His brother, who pitched last year, will also be shown to be too old.

2002
» The Rangers stop the Blue Jays, 10–7, as SS Alex Rodriguez ties an major-league record by becoming the 4th player to hit six home runs in a 3–game span. His two round–trippers give him the American League lead with 44.

2004
The Spokane Indians (Texas Rangers) edge the Tri-City Dust Devils (Colorado Rockies) 2-1 In 23 innings. The Northwest League game, which lasted 6 hours, 37 minutes., was scoreless for 19 innings and suspended in a 1-1 tie in the 21st inning the previous night.

2006
At Fenway Park, the Yankees beat the Red Sox in the night cap to complete a day-night doubleheader sweep. The 14-11 slugfest, in which the Al East Division rivals bang out a total 34 hits, takes 4 hours and 45 minutes to play making it the longest nine-inning game in big league history. A team scores in nine of the 18 half-innings.

2006
Mike Lieberthal passes Red Dooin to become the Phillies’ all-time leader in games as a catcher. The former Philadelphia backstop, who caught 1,124 games from 1902-14, is given credit for being the first catcher to wear shinguards (1906) and as player-manager (1914) tried but failed to convince owner William Barker to buy three promising player from the Baltimore’s International League franchise, which included a pitcher named Babe Ruth.

2006
Blanking the Mariners for seven innings innings at Angel Stadium, Jared Weaver joins Whitey Ford (Yankees, 1950) to become only the second American League rookie to begin a career with nine straight victories as a starter. The 23-year old Angel hurler will need to win his next four games to match Hooks Wiltse (Giants, 1904) who started his freshman season with 13 consecutive wins.

resources for these postings are from nationalpastime.com, Wikipedia, time.com, and baseballibrary.com

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Aug 19

1900
» Milwaukee's Rube Waddell and Chicago White Sox hurler Roy Patterson go 17 innings before Rube wins, 2–1 in the first game of a twinbill. Three days earlier, the two squared off for 12 innings with Waddell winning, 3–2. When Connie Mack offers Rube a few days off to go fishing if he'll pitch the nitecap, Rube allows just one hit and wins in five innings, 1–0.

1901
» Kid Nichols and Christy Mathewson square off the 3rd time in seven days, with Nichols winning easily, 11-6. New York makes four errors, but a tired Matty is pasted for 13 hits while striking out just one.

At St. Louis, the Pirates knock out the NL's leading pitcher Jack Harper (21-8) in the 3rd en route to a 9-5 win. Harper, 21-7 at the start of the day, will end up at 23-13.

Called up for his first major league start at age 21, Harper halted the National League-record 24-game losing streak of the 1899 Cleveland Spiders by winning 5-4. When the NL was cut from twelve teams to eight in 1900, he was transferred to the Cardinals, for whom he went 23-13 in 1901, finishing second in the NL in wins and winning percentage. After two more average years, he again won 23 (losing 9) with a career-low 2.37 ERA for the Reds and was third in the NL in wins and winning percentage. After missing most of 1906 with a finger injury and bone chips in his elbow, he was traded to the Cubs in October. A holdout the following year ended his major league career.

1902
» Baltimore outfielder Albert Selbach sets the post-1900 mark in the AL by making four errors, a mark tied by Braves flychaser Fred Nicholson in 1922.

1909
» The Phillies are rained out for a 10th consecutive day.

1910
» At Cincinnati, the Giants win 9–3 beating Jack Rowan. Christy Mathewson allows nine hits in coasting to his 20th win of the year and his 17th straight victory over the Reds.

1911
» Thirty-five thousand gather at the not-yet-completed Polo Grounds to watch the Reds finally get to Christy Mathewson after 22 straight losses, beating him for the first time since May 1908. Matty, after saving the 5–4 opener for Hooks Wiltse with two scoreless frames, starts the nightcap, goes five innings, and loses 7–4. Mike Mitchell leads the Reds in the nitecap by hitting for the cycle off Matty, and adding a double. A crowd of 35,000 view the loss.

1915
» Red Faber pitches the White Sox to a 2–1 win over the Red Sox, beating Rube Foster. With the Tigers' win over the A's, Boston and Detroit are virtually tied for 1st.

1917
» Coaching at 3B in a 1–1 game against Washington, Ty Cobb gives base runner "Tioga" George Burns a shove when Burns stops at 3B on a long hit; Burns keeps going and scores the winning run. Clark Griffith protests, and Ban Johnson upholds him, as the rules now ban coaches from touching a runner. The game is replayed, and Washington wins 2–0.

1921
» In game two at Boston, Ty Cobb gets hit No. 3,000, off Boston P Elmer Myers. At 34, he's the youngest ever to do so. Ty has three of the 19 hits that Myers allows. Cole gives up four to win 10–0. Boston takes the opener, 13–8, as Cobb collects three hits.

1930
» Goose Goslin hits three consecutive home runs for St. Louis to back George Blaeholder's 7–0 shutout of the Philadelphia A's.

In the first of two, Chicago's Hack Wilson connects off Phils P Sugar Sweetland for his 43rd home run, tying Chuck Klein's National League record set last year. In RF, Klein waves to Wilson as he circles the bases. The Phils hold on for a 9–8 win with Claude Willoughby the winner over rookie Bud Teachout. The second game ends in a 6–6 tie after 16 innings.

1931
» At Chicago, Lefty Grove (25–2)wins his 16th consecutive game, 4–2, tying the American League record set by Walter Johnson and Joe Wood in 1912. Grove holds the Sox scoreless till the 9th, while the A's score in the 2nd, 3rd and 8th off Red Faber. Grove has completed all but one of the wins.

The Giants score single runs in each of the last three innings to beat the Reds, 6–5. Giants Shanty Hogan is the first catcher to start three DPs—only one other catcher, Damian Miller in 1999—will match him. The three DPs ties a major-league record for catchers.

1941
» Pittsburgh Pirates manager Frankie Frisch is ejected by umpire Jocko Conlan from the second game of a doubleheader when he appears on the field with an umbrella to protest the playing conditions at Brooklyn's Ebbets Field. The rainy argument is later portrayed in a famous oil painting by artist Norman Rockwell.

to be continued...



Edited 8/19/2008 11:55 am by budwyche1
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Aug 19

1945
» In game two of a doubleheader against the Reds, 37-year-old slugger Jimmie Foxx makes his first ML start pitching, the first seven innings for the Philadelphia Blue Jays. He leaves with a 4–1 lead, and Andy Karl saves Foxx's only ML decision, a 6–2 final. Double X's ERA in 10 ML appearances is 1.52. The lidlifter goes the Phils as well, 5–0, though they are mathematically eliminated from a 1st place finish.

One of the greatest power hitters in major league history, Foxx broke in as a catcher, won fame as a first baseman, and filled in elsewhere, including several turns on the mound.

Born at Sudlersville, MD, Foxx grew strong doing chores on his father's farm. At age ten, he had had enough of farm life, and tried to join the army. Rejected by the military, he turned to sports, especially his first love, track. He played high school baseball and was soon demonstrating the power which would make him famous. His power displays caught the attention of Frank "Home Run" Baker, who was managing Easton of the Eastern Shore League. After being invited for a tryout, Foxx soon became Baker's protege. Baker owed a favor to his old boss, Connie Mack, and recommended the youngster. Mack took the 17-year-old Foxx in 1925 and sat him next to him on the Athletics' bench for several seasons. Mack had the young Mickey Cochrane at catcher, so he converted Foxx to first base, where he became a regular in 1928.

Before long, Foxx was being called "the righthanded Babe Ruth." In virtually every AL park, there was a story to tell about a mighty Foxx homer. In Chicago, he hit a ball over the double-decked stands at Comiskey Park, clearing 34th Street. His gigantic clout in Cleveland won the 1935 All-Star Game. In Yankee Stadium, his blast high into the left field upper deck had enough power to break a seat. In St. Louis, his ninth inning blast in Game Five of the 1930 Series just about clinched it for the A's. In Detroit, he hit one of the longest balls ever, way up into the left field bleachers.

At bat, Foxx presented a menacing picture. A strong, powerful man, he held the bat at the end and stood fairly deep in the batter's box, using a wide stance and a full stride into the ball. As the pitch approached, his powerful arm muscles flexed visibly before he hit the ball. Like many sluggers, Foxx struck out often, and he led the AL seven times.

Perhaps more impressive than his homers was his record as an RBI man. Like Babe Ruth and Lou Gehrig, he drove in over 100 runs in 13 seasons. Also hitting for average, he won the Triple Crown in 1933 (.356, 48 HR, 163 RBI), one of three seasons he led the league in RBI; his best RBI mark was 175 in 1938, when he would have captured his second Triple Crown if not for Hank Greenberg's 58 HR. He was the HR champ four times despite competition from Ruth, Gehrig, Greenberg, and DiMaggio.

In 1932 Foxx hit 58 homers; he might have hit more than 60 if not for a spell in August when he suffered from an injured wrist. Five times he hit the right field screen in St. Louis; the screen was not there when Ruth hit 60 HR in 1927. Also in 1932, a screen that Ruth hadn't had to contend with was erected in left field in Cleveland. Reportedly, Foxx hit that at least three times.

Foxx never made big money with the financially troubled Athletics, and he had to be unloaded to Tom Yawkey's Boston Red Sox, where he was paid well. A good-natured and well-liked man, he became an immediate favorite. He also took a young slugger under his wing. "I truly loved Foxxie," said Ted Williams some 40 years later.

Foxx was sent to the Cubs in 1942. He retired in 1943, but came back to play a few games during WWII with the Cubs and Phillies. His exceptionally strong throwing arm even enabled him to pitch in nine games for the Phillies in 1945, including two starts. The BBWAA elected him to the Hall of Fame in 1951.

A friend to all, Double X was always picking up the check. He drank heavily, saw several business ventures fail, and what little money he had made in baseball disappeared. He managed in the minors, coached at Minneapolis (American Association), and took a turn in the Red Sox radio booth in 1946. In July 1967, at age 59, he choked to death on a piece of meat while dining with his brother. Foxx is still ninth on the all-time HR list (534), sixth in RBI (1921), and fourth in slugging percentage (.609).

1948
» In the Eastern Shore League, Ed Santulli of Rehoboth Beach pitches a 10-0 no-hitter over Federalsburg, the 3rd no-hitter in the league in four days. On August 16, Ed Black of Salisbury no-hit Milford. 4-0. while Gene Kern of Cambridge did the same, beating Federalsburg, 12-0.

1950
» The Gillette Safety Razor Co. pays $800,000 for TV rights to the WS. Radio rights will add another $175,000 more.

The Pirates outslug the Cubs, 13–9, for their sixth win in seven games. Ralph Kiner slugs two homers to put him seven days and nine games ahead of last year, when he hit 54. He has rapped eight this month and four in the last five games. Clyde McCullough adds a bases loaded triple, sac fly, and two-run double, while Johnny Hopp homers. The Cubs answer with homers by Hank Sauer, Mickey Owen, and Roy Smalley, but its not enough. Reliever Bob Rush loses to Murry Dickson.

1951
» In his most interesting promotional stunt, Bill Veeck signs a 3'7" midget, Eddie Gaedel, who goes to bat wearing the number 1/8 in the first inning of the nightcap with the Tigers. Lefty Bob Cain laughingly walks him on four pitches. Jim Delsing then pinch runs, but the Tigers win, 6–2. Two days later the ML bars Eddie Gaedel from appearing in any more games.

to be continued...

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