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    • Like the deal, hate the BS
  • To:All
  • 12/15/12
  • murphstates

If this trade is completed with the names being discussed, I like it. Love d'Arnaud, Gose, eh, but certainly an upgrade over what we have and anyone close in our system. If other pieces are in on either side we'll see. But while eagerly waiting for a deal to be finalized and announced I have to read this abomination by Met management shill Ken Davidoff. Could we once trade or let a player move on without the character assassination?

Amazin’s won’t knuckle under Dickey’s laughable threats to leave

By KEN DAVIDOFF
Last Updated: 3:26 AM, December 15, 2012

This past week at Citi Field, R.A. Dickey broke character — as one of Santa’s elves, at a Mets holiday party centered around young victims of Hurricane Sandy — to show his true character. All about himself once again, Dickey issued the laughable threat that, if the Mets didn’t extend his contract, he’d bolt the organization after 2013.

The Mets are prepared to call the knuckleballer’s bluff with flair. As of last night, the club was engaged in serious trade discussions that would send the reigning National League Cy Young Award winner to Toronto for stud catching prospect Travis d’Arnaud and perhaps other, lesser players.

Forget about Dickey, who is not expected to sign an extension with Toronto, bolting Flushing for the 2014 campaign. Now he’ll be gone a year earlier than he predicted, for the top prospect in Toronto’s rich farm system, a guy the Mets can control through 2018.

The Mets are poised to pull this off even though Dickey’s unwieldy personality, the same personality that fueled his remarkable climb to greatness, mitigated the Mets’ options. Dickey’s remarks Tuesday underlined how risky it would be to employ Dickey as a one-year, $5-million, extension-less player in 2013.

This transaction marks a brave new path for the Mets, one in which sound baseball operations trumps sentiment. This in the same week when the Yankees are giving 39-year-old Ichiro Suzuki, who clocked 10 mediocre weeks and two phenomenal ones in The Bronx, a two-year extension seemingly because fans adored his inability to hit home runs.

Dickey’s request for two years and $26 million, beyond the $5 million due to him next season, was eminently reasonable. Yet that doesn’t mean that the Mets needed to concede. He is 38, and while the data on knuckleballers’ aging bodes well for the right-hander, it’s not a huge sample by which to go. There’s reasonable doubt that Dickey can replicate his outstanding 2012 campaign.

And, in an underappreciated part of this saga that soared into visibility this week, Dickey can be a handful. He clearly has enjoyed his rise from the ashes into a Flushing folk hero, and while he deserves praise and riches, there’s also the matter of him having to coexist peacefully in a workplace. His gift for self-promotion and his love of attention don’t endear himself to most teammates. Instead, his durability and outstanding results led him to be appreciated but far from beloved.

If Dickey can’t control his verbiage at a holiday party — “Folks, not today, not with the kids here” was all he had to say to reporters — then how would a full season of uncertainty feel? How many times would Dickey spout off publicly? Or work behind the scenes to make the Mets look bad and boost his own brand?

That’s why Mets general manager Sandy Alderson has been saying all along that he wasn’t enthralled by the notion of keeping Dickey for the one year. And it’s why there’s something to be said for selling high on Dickey. If he puts up another Cy Young campaign for Toronto in 2013 and d’Arnaud flops for the Mets, then we’ll rightly rip the Mets. But this is a sound process, and d’Arnaud, a potential All-Star at a position in which the supply has never appeared weaker, is the sort of high-impact player Alderson said he would need to get to let go of the ultra-popular Dickey.

Dickey’s love of his narrative, the embracing of his professional challenge, helped him defy the odds. Now it’s time for the Mets to let the Blue Jays, armed for a 2013 pennant run, roll the dice on him and build a Dickey-free future in Flushing.

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  • 12/15/12
  • 4545_ajd
Maybe Davidoff just doesn't like Dickey, this is not the first negative article about him from Davidoff, he wrote another one during the All Star Break.
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  • 12/15/12
  • sheadro
Ugh onlybthe Mets/NY media can try to destroy one ofvthe best stories in recent baseball history. I love the tact we took to get the trade we wanted, but this is uncalled for
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  • 12/15/12
  • murphstates
He makes it pretty evident that either he thinks or he knows Alderson shares his view of Dickey.
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  • 12/15/12
  • leaffie
Whether true or not, I hate organizations that slime a guy on the way out. Boston is famous for it, and now it looks like the Mets are joining the bandwagon.
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  • 12/15/12
  • PrayedforBay
I just read that article.. I have no idea what that was about. He isn't usually like that. Whatever the motivation, it was a pathetic attempt to smear his character.
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  • 12/15/12
  • marybeth12

My daughter and I went to one of his book signings this summer and when we were driving home, she told me that she thought he was into himself. There was something about him that she just didn't like - maybe she is right.

I know he won the CY Young but let's be real here, if the Mets didn't give him another chance, he'd probably be a middle school English teacher in TN and would never have written that book or be in a documentary and wouldn't be a CY Young winner.

I hope this trade goes thru because used to be a big fan of him but I am tired of his "me" attitude.


Edited 12/15/12   by  marybeth12
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  • 12/15/12
  • kinerskrnr
That really isn't a proper way to judge character. Dickey is as good of a guy as there is.
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  • 12/15/12
  • govmule72

He doesn't seem like a "me" guy at all. He does a lot for charity, and spends a lot of time working with kids in community initiatives. In fact, he was doing so when he made his "negative" comments towards the Mets.

It's a shame that a baseball payer comes along with a great story, a will to succeed, a generous heart, and some a substantial intellect to boot, and we gotta get jealous and put him down for it.

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  • 12/15/12
  • marybeth12

I don't know what to think about this. I know he won 20 games and a CY Young this year but I just keep thinking that he would be a nobody if the Mets didn't give him a chance a few years back.

He does seem like a nice guy (my daughter doesn't think so) and he never seemed liked a show me the money type of person - even if it isn't a lot.

I just want to see the Mets do well. If trading RA for prospects who hopefully work out is the answer then so be it. I just think he reached the top of the incline on the roller coaster and he will not see another year like this. Especially if all of the media attention has gone to his head which has happened to other players.

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  • 12/15/12
  • marybeth12

Believe me, I'm not jealous of him. Also I am just so tired of hearing the Mets are trading RA, they are signing RA that I wish they would just do something!

Meanwhile others free agents are being signed by everyone. It's like Omar Minaya all over again.

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  • 12/15/12
  • PrayedforBay

Really, I have the complete opposite opinion of the guy. His message isn't self absorbed in my judgment, rather It's of someone who felt compelled to tell the tale of his journey (rather than repress it) which started with incredible hardship and personal demons. Perhaps the most compelling part of his story, is that he is now able to tell it; key word - able.

This is also a man who does incredible charity work and maintains a striking degree of humility given where he is now. From where he's been to where he is now is humbling and a wonderful human story.

"I know he won the CY Young but let's be real here, if the Mets didn't give him another chance, he'd probably be a middle school English teacher in TN and would never have written that book or be in a documentary and wouldn't be a CY Young winner"

I'm not sure what your point is here, that he shouldn't be asking for a fair deal?

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  • 12/15/12
  • murphstates
Yes, the Mets gave him a chance and in exchange he gave them three years of elite performance for the price of a marginal fifth starter. Whatever he owed the organization has long since been repaid. He's earned his money and then some.
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  • To:All
  • 12/15/12
  • CAPT_ALLCAPS

This is pretty much the same thing they did with Pagan. After he got traded they said he was a "clubhouse cancer" and had a bad attitude. This type of character assassination seems to be a page out of the PR playbook or something.

If Pagan was such a "clubhouse cancer", why did the Giants give him 4 years/40 Mil?

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  • 12/15/12
  • murphstates
What players and coaches were those? I don't recall anyone putting their name to any accusations against Pagan.
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  • To:All
  • 12/15/12
  • eastvisitr
Is Davidoff a Mets plant? I don't read him so I wouldn't know but the article is ridiculous. With the way the Mets have handled their players and pr Dickey had every right to express frustration and uncertainty over his situation. Even if he was thinking about himself. So what? He's earned the right to do that. He holds himself accountable and always gives 100% in every facet of the game. As a fan that's all I can ask for.
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